Archive for the ‘Custom instantiation’ Category

Datasources allow mainly to select things from drop-down lists in forms publisher forms and workflow forms.

Datasources are nothing but java classes that get executed when a form loads. The class must implement one of the following interfaces:

com.interwoven.datasource.ListDataSource;
com.interwoven.datasource.MapDataSource;
com.interwoven.datasource.SimpleDataSource;
com.interwoven.datasource.SortedValuesMapDataSource;

As part of the implementation, the class must therefore have an execute method which gets passed a DataSourceContext object. The return value and type vary depending of which datasource class you implement.

A SimpleDataSource implementation returns a single value. Forms publisher will use the value for example in a text field.

public String execute(String sessionId, String context, Map params) {
String datasource="value";
return(datasource);
}

A ListDataSource implementation will return a List of strings. Forms publisher will use the same value for the form’s value and label.

public List<String> execute(DataSourceContext context) {
List<String> datasource = new ArrayList<String>();
datasource.add(“value”);
return(datasource);
}

The context contains some information about the session id, the server context (the vpath of the current node) and the other custom parameters passed to the datasource.

A MapDataSource implementation will return map of strings. Forms publisher will use one value for the label and the other for the value. The key is the value string.

public Map<String, String> execute(DataSourceContext context) {
Map<String,String> datasource = new HashMap<String,String>();
datasource.put("value","label"); // make sure you convert numbers to proper strings
return(datasource);
}

The SortedMapDataSource implementation returns the same as a MapDataSource, except Forms Publisher will sort the results alphabetically.

public Map<String, String> execute(DataSourceContext context) {
Map<String, String> datasource = new HashMap<String, String>();
datasource.put("value", "label"); // make sure you convert numbers to proper strings
return (datasource);
}

In order to create a new datasource, we need to edit the local/config/DataSourceConfig.xml file. This file is an XML document which defines which datasources are available to the system as a whole.

For the example that follows, we will create a datasource that will allow a user to select an edition from the current branch. We need to add our datasource to the list by adding the following:

<datasource>
<name>Main Branch Editions</name>
<classname>com.acme.util.BranchEditionsDatasource</classname>
<param name="branch">/default/main</param>
</datasource>

We will build a class with that name as follows:

package com.acme.util;

import com.interwoven.cssdk.factory.CSLocalFactory;
import com.interwoven.cssdk.filesys.CSBranch;
import com.interwoven.cssdk.filesys.CSEdition;
import com.interwoven.cssdk.filesys.CSVPath;
import com.interwoven.datasource.core.DataSourceContext;
import com.interwoven.datasource.SortedValuesMapDataSource;
import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Locale;
import java.util.Map;
import java.util.Properties;
import java.util.logging.Level;
import java.util.logging.Logger;

public class BranchEditionsDataSource implements SortedValuesMapDataSource {

 public Map<String, String> execute(DataSourceContext context) {
 Map<String, String> parameters = context.getAllParameters();
 Map<String, String> datasource = new HashMap<String, String>();
 String sessionString = context.getSessionId();
 String configFilePath = "/apps/interwoven/teamsite/cssdk/cssdk.cfg";
 Properties localProperties = new Properties();
 localProperties.setProperty("cssdk.cfg.path", configFilePath);
 CSLocalFactory csLocalFactory = (CSLocalFactory) CSLocalFactory.getFactory(localProperties);
 CSClient client = null;

 try {
 client = csLocalFactory.getClient(sessionString, Locale.ENGLISH, "BranchEditionsDataSource", "localhost");
 if (client != null) {
 String branchParameter = parameters.get("branch");
 CSVPath branchVPath = null;
 if (branchParameter != null) {
 branchVPath = new CSVPath(branchParameter);
 } else {
 branchVPath = new CSVPath(context.getServerContext());
 }
 if (branchVPath != null) {
 branchVPath = branchVPath.getBranch(); // make sure we have a branch, really...
 CSBranch branch = client.getBranch(branchVPath, true);
 if (branch != null) {
 CSEdition[] editions = branch.getEditions(true, false, -1);
 for (CSEdition edition : editions) {
 datasource.put(edition.getVPath().toString(), edition.getName() + " - " +                                             edition.getDescription());
 }
 } else {
 throw new NullPointerException("branch is null");
 }
 } else {
 throw new NullPointerException("branch vpath is null");
 }
 } else {
 throw new NullPointerException("client is null");
 }
 } catch (Exception ex) {
 datasource = new HashMap<String, String>();
 datasource.put("error", "An error occured. Please contact your administrator");
 Logger.getLogger(BranchEditionsDataSource.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
 }

 return (datasource);
 }
}

The context gives you all you need to connect to the local Teamsite server using the session id. From there, we can either grab the editions of the branch passed as a parameter or the current branch. You can also extend

com.interwoven.livesite.common.cssdk.datasource.AbstractDataSource.

This will give you the ability to grab the client with a simple method call of:

CSClient client=getClient(context);

You will have to use the parameters that the class expects to make the connection:

<param name="servername">teamsite</param>
<param>http://teamsite:80</param>
<param name="csFactory">com.interwoven.cssdk.factory.CSLocalFactory</param>

Once the class has been compiled into the toolkit, we can then tell out formspublisher item to use it.

we can use a “inline” element, with a Datasource “pseudo-command” (note that this is case sensitive). This works for text instances and select, radio and checkbox instances.

<select>
    <inline command="Datasource:executeComponent:Main Branch Editions" />
</select>

All you now need to do is check the work in the form’s drop down list..

I was doing something the other day that had to do with customising an instantiation form for a workflow. It was meant to pass a day of the week to a workflow and I wanted it to be easy. I was going to put a drop down list of strings ranging Monday to Sunday and pass that to the workflow.

Parsing the date inside the workflow task meant that an integer from 0 to 6 was going to be more appropriate but I didn’t know what 0 represented, so I wrote the little java snippet below to help me out:

import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.util.Calendar;
import java.util.Locale;

public class CalendarLocaleTest {

 public static void main(String[] args){
 Locale locale = Locale.ENGLISH;
 Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance(locale);
 cal.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK,cal.getFirstDayOfWeek());
 SimpleDateFormat dateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("EEEEE",locale);

 for (int dayOfWeek=0; dayOfWeek<7;dayOfWeek++){
 cal.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK,dayOfWeek);
 System.out.println(dayOfWeek + " - " + dateFormat.format(cal.getTime()) + (dayOfWeek==cal.getFirstDayOfWeek()?" *first day of the week":""));
 }
 }
}

This led me to write the instantiation drop-down list looking like this (I work in the UK):

<checkbox multiple=”t” required=”t”>
<option label=”Sunday” value=”1″/>
<option label=”Monday” value=”2″/>
<option label=”Tuesday” value=”3″/>
<option label=”Wednesday” value=”4″/>
<option label=”Thursday” value=”5″/>
<option label=”Friday” value=”6″/>
<option label=”Saturday” value=”0″/>
</checkbox>

This could also (and probably should) be turned into a datasource displaying the days in the locale of the client browser. Right now, this was sufficient for me.

The allowed element inside text, textarea, select, radio, checkbox, readonly and hidden works fine on datacapture forms within forms publisher. Whenever a workflow instantiation form uses the allowed element, it’s not using it to use the instance designed by it.

<item pathid=”somepath” name=”somepath”>
<text>
<allowed><cred role=”master” /></allowed>
</text>
<readonly />
</item>

This snippet of XML should have allowed masters to edit the field and anyone else would just be able to look at it without modifying it. Though this works fine in forms publisher, the workflow engine’s rendition does not concern itself with such authorisation.

Instead, formAPI has to be used. To find out the current user’s name, group and roles, we can use the IWDatacapture’s getUser(), getGroups() and getRoles() methods and show or hide the fields as we please.

getUser() returns the short username (not “Laurent Picquet” but “lpiquet”), getGroups() returns an array of group names the current user belongs to and getRoles() returns an array of roles the current user has in the the current branch (“admin,master” in my case).

var roles = IWDatacapture.getRoles();
 var isMaster=false;
 for (var i in roles){
 if (roles[i]=='master'){
 isMaster=true;
 }
 }
 prompt("isMaster",isMaster);